Archive for December, 2009

Tailgating Holiday Anthems

Roswell Rudd and Steven Bernstein tailgating true holiday anthems this eve, can't say how great it was to have them here.... Que Viva Ros.

Roswell Rudd and Steven Bernstein in Duo, 12/20/2009

midboggling tasty and useful.

NYSWUY event 5, curated by Josh Roseman

Low End Theory

Recently we were blessed to have the impeccable Dan Peck grace our continuing series of creative slidework creations. Before you say a tuba is not a slide instrument, I’m 100% sure there are at least five slides on the beast that Dan was wrangling, so it count pretty solidly in my book! He sent some thoughts on his DoomQuartet that performed, and here they are for your enlightenment:

I’ve recently rediscovered the initial reason that I was attracted to the tuba: the sound of the incredible low notes that come out of it’s bell. I think that, in an effort to improve technical facility and clarity of sound, the tuba playing community has been focused largely on controlling the middle and high registers of the instrument. And while I love any and all sounds that come out of the tuba, it seems to me that the low/pedal register is all but ignored in creative tuba playing today. This attitude has much to do with my interest in Doom metal, which is a very drone and low sonority based music. So, in my compositions as well as in my improvisations, I am curious to expand my limited knowledge of the depths of the tuba’s true range.

I want to thank Josh for starting this great series. I especially appreciate the open forum aspect of it; I appreciate the opportunity to discuss my ideas almost as much as I do playing them. It’s arguable to what degree creative music necessitates a closed-circle type of atmosphere in order to prosper; but as always, the creative spirit is universal, and comes from a place of collective curiosity. I hope that this series serves as a constant reminder to musicians/non-musicians alike that this curiosity is what keeps everything happening, and is vital to the survival of creative music.

Best,
Dan

Brian Drye’s Scopa trio, 12.6.09

Brian Drye's trio, hitting hard

Team Scopa, realtime tonecrunch

brian drye 12.06.09 by scrootablelabs

Brian Drye’s Scopa Trio

Brian Drye – Trombone/Compositions

Vinnie Sperrazza – Drums

Geoff Kraly – Electric Bass

Having a chance to curate an evening for the NYSWU was an interesting challenge. My first thought was to bring a new trio I formed this year as an opportunity to perform live. I also thought it would be interesting to pair that with a larger group and I thought of Max Siegel who told me a year ago that he had been writing music for 6 bass trombones and 6 bari saxes. I realized that this would also be a good opportunity to introduce a lot of musicians and trombonists to the series. I’m not sure when I’ll have another opportunity to perform in front of at least 20 other trombonists, many of whom I knew personally but many I was meeting for the first time. This was a sort of unexpected outcome of the event and it was sort of freeing to have so many ears sympathetic to the nuances of trombone. I figured I would be supremely nervous but actually, quite the opposite happened.

Max’s music came across beautifully even for a first reading. Max has a great sense of humor which comes across in his writing. I encourage everyone to check it out. From Max “Thanks again for this great opportunity to get my music read in a great space. We all had a blast and are hoping to do it again soon.” Check back here for more postings and info on upcoming shows.

Brian Drye

Audio recording by Josh Roseman
Reference mix by Wil Farr

“Trombonically Speaking”

George Lewis had just recently recorded "The Solo Trombone Record" when he spoke with Bill Smith from CODA.Check out this really interesting Classic CODA interview of George Lewis by Bill Smith. George discusses touring with Count Basie in Japan, playing in the language of Anthony Braxton and what it means to be a “‘jazz’ trombone player.” Along with a recent forward by the man himself, this paints a really detailed picture of the creative music in the mid 1970’s.

Jacob Garchik / Jacob Sacks duo

Mission statement from Jacob, with media shortly to follow-

amazing set that they performed, stay tuned..!!

When I was in my teens and early twenties, I studied jazz by listening to records, learning tunes, transcribing solos, and going to jam sessions. As I grew older I became more involved in contemporary classical music, improvisation, and music from other cultures. My engagement with jazz was less frequent.
Recently I returned to playing jazz on a regular basis, mostly in the form of weekly jam sessions. I was struck by how much I missed it, and how much it lingered in underused parts of my brain. Over the course of a few months I began to remember and sometimes relearn hundreds of jazz standards. I was captivated by this repertoire, an ever-changing list of tunes which is agreed on by unspoken consensus and common practice. Each one is relatively simple but has something that makes it both satisfying to improvise over, time and time again, and satisfying to play the melody at least twice, intro and outro. Some of them have hardly anything to them, like a theme from a Beethoven symphony: Milestones, C Jam Blues, Nutty, Summertime.
I set out to write some music in tribute to compositions like these. I was aiming for brevity, simplicity, repeatability, and transparency, but of course I strove to do it all in my own compositional style. I enjoyed the process and I plan on writing more of these.
enjoy,
Jacob

Max Seigel, Maximum Slideworking

Max Seigel presented works for 6 bass trombones and 6 baritone saxophones.

Max Seigel presented works for 6 bass trombones and 6 baritone saxophones.

Tonight’s NYSWU meeting at 58N6th Media labs was curated by Brian Drye and was billed as the biggest and most bombastic event yet to be presented as part of our ongoing bi-monthly series of trombone-centric episodes. After a killing set by Brian’s Scopa Trio featuring Geoff Kraly on bass and Vinnie Sperrazza on drums, Max Seigel delivered into the world a most spectacular sound by way of his twelve person unit featuring six bass trombone and six baritone saxophones. Then, as if that wasn’t enough, Max’s “A Dozen Low-Pitched Roses” was interpreted by fourteen trombonist with the help of Kraly and Sperrazza was presented with featured soloist Josh Roseman and and guest bass clarinetist Don Slatoff. This was by far one of the most mind blowing experiences I’ve ever witnessed, and am glad to have shared in the experience with the packed house that was curious to see exactly what’s been going on in the world of New York slide players.

From Drye-the-curator:

Max’s music came across beautifully even for a first reading. Max has a great sense of humor which comes across in his writing. I encourage everyone to check it out. From Max “Thanks again for this great opportunity to get my music read in a great space. We all had a blast and are hoping to do it again soon.” Check back here for more postings and info on upcoming shows.

Brian Drye

Return top